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Thursday, May 23, 2024

Greater Anglia donates accessibility ramps to help heritage railway

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Greater Anglia has donated several accessibility ramps to the North Norfolk Railway, to help customers with accessibility needs who travel on this popular heritage line.

The train operator has donated seven ramps to the North Norfolk Railway, a heritage line which operates steam and diesel trains between Sheringham and Holt.

The ramps, which were previously used to help passengers on and off Greater Anglia’s Class 321 trains, will be used by the heritage railway to help customers on and off their trains.

Previously, the North Norfolk Railway used heavy ramps, which often required the strength of two people. The ramps donated by Greater Anglia are much lighter and can be operated by one person.

Jonathan Denby, Head of Corporate Affairs, Greater Anglia, said: “We are very pleased to support the North Norfolk Railway by donating these ramps.

“We know many people use Greater Anglia services to travel to Sheringham, where they enjoy a day out on the Poppy Line, so it is great to help improve accessibility for passengers making those trips in North Norfolk.

“New trains are now running on all routes across our network. Although some of our trains low floors and a retractable step enabling level boarding at many stations, we have an entire set of new ramps, compatible with our new trains, to assist any passengers who may need help, where they are needed.

This meant the previous ramps were available for further use, so we thought it would be helpful to donate them to colleagues at the North Norfolk Railway, as a local heritage line which connects with our services at Sheringham.

“We are always happy to support the local community where possible and practical.”

Graham Hukins, Commercial, Business & Administration Manager, North Norfolk Railway, said: “We are very grateful to Greater Anglia for these ramps which will help improve accessibility to our historic steam and heritage diesel trains.

“The vintage carriages we use were built before access was a consideration in the design, so having sufficient lightweight ramps will enable us to widen the range of historic vehicles that are accessible to wheelchair users and will form a key part of our initiative to diversify our audience and welcome more visitors with disabilities.”

Image credit: Greater Anglia

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