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Sunday, June 16, 2024

Green light for host of new rail services in South West England

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Britain’s rail regulator has approved South West Trains (SWT) plans to add new services from December.

SWT will add 800 seats on weekdays between London and Somerset, introduce new Sunday services between Salisbury and London Waterloo and create new services between Bruton, Frome and the capital.

Other service improvements include two trains per hour from Exeter to Honiton between 16.00 and 18.00, and the introduction of a half- hourly service in late afternoon and early evening between Salisbury and London Waterloo.

Tim Shoveller, managing director of South West Trains, said: “We are delighted that these plans have been approved and we will now be able to press ahead with major improvements on the West of England line from December.

“Good transport links to cities such as Salisbury and of course, our capital city, play a crucial role in helping to keep the local economy growing, and we are certain that our customers will enjoy using these new services.”

Full details of the new services, which will be available from the December 14 timetable change, can be found here.

1 COMMENT

  1. Not to mention the new Class 707’s to be built in 2017 as South West Trains are to expire next year but the December timetable won’t be affected as SWT loses the franchise if Stagecoach teams up with Abellio to retain the franchise or new bidders such as Govia, National Express and First Group could take over the franchise with a new train operator to take over from South West Trains. Plus Diesel Multiple Unit trains using the Lymington branch line could be used on the Swanage line if possible as Class 450 Electric Multiple Unit trains are to operate on the Lymington Line.

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